Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Cindy Keen Reynders And Local Media




Cindy Keen Reynders and I were at a book launch this past Saturday for an author friend of ours. It was held at the local Barnes & Noble in Cheyenne, and a lot of our author friends were there. Also present was a newspaper man from our local paper. He not only writes editorials, he is currently writing other things as well: short stories and such are in his future.

I introduced him to Cindy and the two of them went back and forth with ideas, possibilities, and writing in general. Cindy is a natural at this since she works in marketing for the local school district. The end result: he promised to do some promotional work for Cindy in the paper when her book comes out. I had already mentioned this to him before, but meeting and talking with her in person cemented everything.

Besides extolling Cindy's talents in this post, I want to make everyone aware that you should not overlook anything in your locality. The big book stores are changing and there are new players in town. I walked in the door to B&N and immediately saw the big display for the Nook where the new and best sellers used to be. That should tell us something. Plus, the store is adding more games and less books. However, don't avoid them completely: they are a piece of the big puzzle. If nothing else, a writer can gain exposure and make friends with local authors and readers alike. For example: the book launch author's husband told me he sees my name all over the internet. That's because another writer pointed  out to him that I was Blaze.

So, make friends in your community and be willing to become a part of the writing family there. You won't be sorry.

Blaze

6 comments:

  1. Very true. Twitter is not the best avenue for getting visibility. Nor is Facebook. Locally, some of the best spots are Comic Shops, along with Brick & Mortar stores. I'm familiar with the manager at a local Starbucks, posed the inquiry as to whether they sponsor such things as a book signing. Guess what? The do. It doesn't take much to walk into a book store, a coffee shop, schmooze a bit and wala - you have a venue to sign your book, and a sponsor who will do practically anything to get people to buy their product even if they don't buy your book ;-)

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  2. Starbucks is a great idea, Rebecca! The one on one approach with small business owners and managers is valuable. If we can all help each other out, so much the better. You have me thinking, and I'm compiling another list of places to go and sell some books. as if my mind is not already on overload.

    AAGH!

    Blaze

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  3. Networking is very powerful, I believe.

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  4. Networking is very powerful, Cindy! The old days of the reclusive writer are gone. Writing like that is okay, but to sell your books, you have to step out of the box.

    Blaze

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  5. The manager told me to locate the information on their website. I have no clue where it is - I tried "sponsoring events" but came up with past or current projects. I suppose it's better to speak to your local manager. Or even smaller business' - personally I don't like Starbuck's coffee, it always tastes burnt - but I love the blueberry scones!

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  6. I always prefer the personal touch with the manager, Rebecca. Works for me. I love the scones too. :D

    Blaze

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